terça-feira, Janeiro 22, 2013
shrbr:

T T T by pierpmont on Flickr.

shrbr:

T T T by pierpmont on Flickr.

quinta-feira, Janeiro 17, 2013

Talking to BBC, Criolo shows his homage to all cities and places of the world which have been victims of prejudice. (Dialogues and lyrics in portuguese only).

***

Em série da BBC, Criolo mostra sua homenagem a todas as cidades e lugares do mundo que sofrem preconceito.

Hieronymus Bosch (c. 1450 - 1516). The Temptation of St. Anthony (c. 1475-1480). Oil on wood. 131.5 x 225 cm. Museu Nacional de Arte Antiga, Lisbon.
Source: http://www.lukemastin.com/testing/hieronymus/magnify_temptation.html
***
Hieronymus Bosch (c. 1450 - 1516). As Tentações de Santo Antão (c.1475-1480). Óleo sobre madeira. 131,5 x 225 cm. Museu Nacional de Arte Antiga, Lisboa.
Fonte: http://www.lukemastin.com/testing/hieronymus/magnify_temptation.html

Hieronymus Bosch (c. 1450 - 1516). The Temptation of St. Anthony (c. 1475-1480). Oil on wood. 131.5 x 225 cm. Museu Nacional de Arte Antiga, Lisbon.

Source: http://www.lukemastin.com/testing/hieronymus/magnify_temptation.html

***

Hieronymus Bosch (c. 1450 - 1516). As Tentações de Santo Antão (c.1475-1480). Óleo sobre madeira. 131,5 x 225 cm. Museu Nacional de Arte Antiga, Lisboa.

Fonte: http://www.lukemastin.com/testing/hieronymus/magnify_temptation.html

Viver é a coisa mais rara do mundo. A maioria das pessoas apenas existe. Oscar Wilde (1854-1900)

Original quote: “To live is the rarest thing in the world. Most people exist, that is all.”

The Writer

Short movie created by Edson Oda to be submitted to a Quentin Tarantino’s contest.  It tells the story of a character - a young cowbloy - who decides not obey the author of the script. 

Winner of Django Unchained Emerging Artist Contest.

Curta de Edson Oda, criado especialmente para um concurso promovido por Quentin Tarantino. O filme conta a história de uma personagem, um jovem cowboy, que decide desobedecer as determinações do autor do roteiro.

Vencedor do Django Unchained Emerging Artist Contest.

SEM DIÁLOGOS. TEXTO EM INGLÊS.

(Fonte: vimeo.com)

Malaria, a short movie by Edson Oda which combines a large range of techniques and a great screenplay, resulting in a little masterpiece of creativity.

Language: Portuguese.
Subtitles: English.

Malaria, um curta de Edson Oda, que alia técnicas variadas a um ótimo roteiro para produzir uma pequena e criativa obra-prima.

(Fonte: vimeo.com)

quarta-feira, Janeiro 16, 2013

Criolo sings “Bogotá” on the TV show Manos e Minas. June 11th, 2011. 

Criolo - Bogotá
Manos e Minas 11/06/2011 (por cultura)

Brazilian afrobeat by Criolo, rapper and  the greatest revelation of MPB (local acrostic for brazilian pop music) in the 21th century. May Fela Kuti’s music be blessed forever.

"Bogotá", por Criolo (por cultura)

Instituto - Abraka

Gravado ao vivo na Seleta Coletiva @ Studio SP em novembro de 2009.

Daniel Ganjaman: Rhodes, Orgão B4, Arranjos e Vocal
Fernando Catatau: Guitarra
Junior Boca: Guitarra
Samuel Fraga: Bateria
Rian Batista: Baixo
Hugo Hori: Sax Barítono e Tenor
Fernando Bastos: Sax Tenor e Alto
Gustavo Souza:Trompete
Guto Bocão: Percussão
Anderson Bernardi: Percussão

Criolo - Subirusdoistiozin (Videoclipe Oficial) (por criolooficial)

Criolo - Subirusdoistiozin

Single Criolo
Composição - Criolo
Produção musical - Daniel Ganjaman e Marcelo Cabral
Gravado em 2010 no estúdio El Rocha

Criolo - Lion Man

Criolo - voz
Daniel Ganjaman - programação
Marcelo Cabral – baixo elétrico e acústico

Produção musical - Daniel Ganjaman e Marcelo Cabral
Arranjos - Daniel Ganjaman e Marcelo Cabral
Masterização - Fernando Sanches
Arte - Ricardo Fernandes
Fotógrafo - Junior Furlan
Produção Executiva - Biba Berjeaut
Gravado e mixado por Daniel Ganjaman em 2010 no estúdio El Rocha (gravações adicionais estúdio Fine Tuning)
Masterizado no estúdio El Rocha por Fernando Sanches

segunda-feira, Janeiro 14, 2013
aleyma:

Page from the “Taymouth Hours”, made in England in the 2nd quarter of the 14th century (source).

aleyma:

Page from the “Taymouth Hours”, made in England in the 2nd quarter of the 14th century (source).

ancientart:

The Rosetta Stone, Egypt, Ptolemaic Period, 196 BC.
One of the most influential and famous ancient artifacts discovered, the Rosetta Stone is an ancient Egyptian granodiorite stele inscribed with a decree issued at Memphis in 196 BC on behalf of King Ptolemy V. The inscription has three languages on it (Greek, demotic and hieroglyphs), each saying the same thing. Because of the translations, it provided great insight into the mystery of Egyptian hieroglyphs.
The first hieroglyphs were deciphered through distinguishing the name ‘Ptolemy’ in all three scripts.
Courtesy & currently located at the British Museum, London. Photo taken by Hans Hillewaert.
A valuable key to the decipherment of hieroglyphs, the inscription on the Rosetta Stone is a decree passed by a council of priests. It is one of a series that affirm the royal cult of the 13-year-old Ptolemy V on the first anniversary of his coronation.
Artifact statement from the British Museum:







In previous years the family of the Ptolemies had lost control of certain parts of the country. It had taken their armies some time to put down opposition in the Delta, and parts of southern Upper Egypt, particularly Thebes, were not yet back under the government’s control.
Before the Ptolemaic era (that is before about 332 BC), decrees in hieroglyphs such as this were usually set up by the king. It shows how much things had changed from Pharaonic times that the priests, the only people who had kept the knowledge of writing hieroglyphs, were now issuing such decrees. The list of good deeds done by the king for the temples hints at the way in which the support of the priests was ensured.
The decree is inscribed on the stone three times, in hieroglyphic (suitable for a priestly decree), demotic (the native script used for daily purposes), and Greek (the language of the administration). The importance of this to Egyptology is immense.
Soon after the end of the fourth century AD, when hieroglyphs had gone out of use, the knowledge of how to read and write them disappeared. In the early years of the nineteenth century, some 1400 years later, scholars were able to use the Greek inscription on this stone as the key to decipher them.
Thomas Young, an English physicist, was the first to show that some of the hieroglyphs on the Rosetta Stone wrote the sounds of a royal name, that of Ptolemy. The French scholar Jean-François Champollion then realized that hieroglyphs recorded the sound of the Egyptian language and laid the foundations of our knowledge of ancient Egyptian language and culture.
Soldiers in Napoleon’s army discovered the Rosetta Stone in 1799 while digging the foundations of an addition to a fort near the town of el-Rashid (Rosetta). On Napoleon’s defeat, the stone became the property of the British under the terms of the Treaty of Alexandria (1801) along with other antiquities that the French had found.

ancientart:

The Rosetta Stone, Egypt, Ptolemaic Period, 196 BC.

One of the most influential and famous ancient artifacts discovered, the Rosetta Stone is an ancient Egyptian granodiorite stele inscribed with a decree issued at Memphis in 196 BC on behalf of King Ptolemy V. The inscription has three languages on it (Greek, demotic and hieroglyphs), each saying the same thing. Because of the translations, it provided great insight into the mystery of Egyptian hieroglyphs.

The first hieroglyphs were deciphered through distinguishing the name ‘Ptolemy’ in all three scripts.

Courtesy & currently located at the British Museum, London. Photo taken by Hans Hillewaert.

A valuable key to the decipherment of hieroglyphs, the inscription on the Rosetta Stone is a decree passed by a council of priests. It is one of a series that affirm the royal cult of the 13-year-old Ptolemy V on the first anniversary of his coronation.

Artifact statement from the British Museum:

In previous years the family of the Ptolemies had lost control of certain parts of the country. It had taken their armies some time to put down opposition in the Delta, and parts of southern Upper Egypt, particularly Thebes, were not yet back under the government’s control.

Before the Ptolemaic era (that is before about 332 BC), decrees in hieroglyphs such as this were usually set up by the king. It shows how much things had changed from Pharaonic times that the priests, the only people who had kept the knowledge of writing hieroglyphs, were now issuing such decrees. The list of good deeds done by the king for the temples hints at the way in which the support of the priests was ensured.

The decree is inscribed on the stone three times, in hieroglyphic (suitable for a priestly decree), demotic (the native script used for daily purposes), and Greek (the language of the administration). The importance of this to Egyptology is immense.

Soon after the end of the fourth century AD, when hieroglyphs had gone out of use, the knowledge of how to read and write them disappeared. In the early years of the nineteenth century, some 1400 years later, scholars were able to use the Greek inscription on this stone as the key to decipher them.

Thomas Young, an English physicist, was the first to show that some of the hieroglyphs on the Rosetta Stone wrote the sounds of a royal name, that of Ptolemy. The French scholar Jean-François Champollion then realized that hieroglyphs recorded the sound of the Egyptian language and laid the foundations of our knowledge of ancient Egyptian language and culture.

Soldiers in Napoleon’s army discovered the Rosetta Stone in 1799 while digging the foundations of an addition to a fort near the town of el-Rashid (Rosetta). On Napoleon’s defeat, the stone became the property of the British under the terms of the Treaty of Alexandria (1801) along with other antiquities that the French had found.

showslow:

Peter Gentenaar’s Ethereal Paper Sculptures Float in the Air Like Jellyfish

Peter Gentenaar‘s art was born out of the limitations of what he could (or couldn’t) create with store-bought paper. So with the help of the Royal Dutch Paper Factory, he built his own paper factory and devised a custom beater that processes and mills long-fiber paper pulp into the material you see in his artwork. He saw the potential that wet paper had when reinforced with very fine bambooribs, and he learned to form the material into anything his imagination would allow.

Gentenaar describes the process: “By beating my pulp very long, an extraordinary play of forces occurs during the drying processes of my paper sculpture. The paper will shrink considerably, up to 40%, and the forces associated with this put the non-shrinking bamboo framework under stress. The tension between the two materials transforms itself into a form reminiscent of a slowly curling autumn leaf.”